Back to Search

Your Search Results

Disclosure

Risk management PEARLS on disclosure of adverse events. American Hospital Association; 2017. The disclosure of adverse events, or unanticipated outcomes, is an evolving process in health care. Difficult issues center on when, how and what to say during disclosure.

(Call No. Pt Rights 131-014 2017)

Order Now

Crucial confrontations – tools for resolving broken promises, violated expectations and bad behavior. Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, Al Switzer. McGraw-Hill Book Company.

(Call No. R M 151-134)

Order Now

What do I say?: Communicating intended or unanticipated outcomes in obstetrics. Fay A. Rozovsky. Wiley/Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer; 2003. The book will help physicians and other health care professionals improve their communication skills with patients and their family members. Written by James R. Woods, a perinatologist, and Fay A. Rozovsky, an attorney, risk management consultant, and authority on informed consent, What Do I Say? explores how to explain risk to patients, how to obtain patient consent, and how to talk with patients when adverse events occur. What Do I Say? is a comprehensive book that explains consent as a foundation of the caregiver-patient relationship, explains the legal context for disclosing bad news, outlines the practical issues associated with OB consent. In addition to the information, research, and practical advice contained in this helpful volume, What Do I Say? is filled with useful case examples that can prepare physicians and other health care professionals for handling communications in potentially high-risk situations.

(Call No. R M 151-113)

Order Now

How to deal with anger & other emotions: In adverse event & error disclosure. Dr. Robert Buckman. Cinemedic Distributors, Inc.; 2004. In the scenarios presented on the DVD, you will see applications of the five-point C-O-N-E-S strategy. The CONES acronym is a handy aide-memoir that makes it easy to recall the five main components of an optimal 'have to tell all' encounter.

(Call No. DVD 002-501)

Order Now

How do I say it? Volume 1. James R. Woods and Fay A. Rozovsky. Quality Medical Communications, LLC; 2004. Effective communication is the basis for good obstetric care. When happy events occur, conversation between care provider and patient is easy. It is a far greater challenge when unanticipated adverse events occur. But, how are these skills acquired? This question is asked frequently by physicians, nurses, risk managers, and patients. The How Do I Say It? video-workbook series effectively teaches these communication skills. the video-workbook series focuses on the key elements of communication and how to communicate when unanticipated and adverse outcomes occur.

(Call No. DVD 002-473)

Order Now

Removing insult from injury-disclosing adverse events. Johns Hopkins University; 2005. There is an obligation for physicians and hospitals to disclose adverse events. However, it is difficult to admit making an error, particularly one that harms a patient. This difficulty is compounded by lack of training on the subject. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health are working to help educate physicians in how to disclose medical errors to their patients and their families. They've developed this video which features short vignettes of doctors talking with patients to illustrate the best methods for disclosing medical errors. The video can be a helpful tool for practicing physicians and physicians in training, risk managers and health care organizations.

(Call No. DVD 002-518)

Order Now

When things go wrong – responding to adverse events: A consensus statement of the Harvard Hospitals. Massachusetts Coalition for the Prevention of Medical Errors; 2006. The document is a consensus statement for the Harvard Hospitals and serves as the foundation for the development of an evidence-based statement addressing unanticipated events.

(Call No. R M 151-117)

Order Now

Risk management PEARLS on disclosure of adverse events. American Hospital Association; 2006. The disclosure of adverse events, or unanticipated outcomes, is an evolving process in health care. The difficult issues center on when, how and what to say during disclosure. ASHRM shares its expertise on this important topic with the release of Risk Management Pearls on Disclosure of Adverse Events. The 44-page, easily shared pocket-sized booklet describes organizational scenarios and strategies for implementing and enhancing the practice of disclosure. With foreword by Jim Conway of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement.

(Call No. Pt Rights 131-014)

Order Now

Healing words – the power of apology in medicine. Michael S. Woods. Joint Commission Resources; 2007. One doctor speaking to other doctors and health care providers about how to provide the best possible care for patients--by actually caring about patients. This powerful book helps health care providers understand and practice what to do after unexpected outcomes--to apologize.

(Call No. Phys 539-047)

Order Now

Disclosing medical errors: A guide to an effective explanation and apology. Joint Commission Resources; 2007. Disclosing mistakes and offering apologies are ethical responsibilities supported by various professional and regulatory organizations, including the Joint Commission and the American Medical Association. Often, saying "sorry" and disclosing information can help prevent or minimize potential litigation. This new book will help clinicians craft an effective apology and give organizations everything they need to know about what to say and how to say it.

(Call No. R M 151-122)

Order Now

Risk management PEARLS on disclosure of adverse events. American Hospital Association; 2012. This booklet is designed to help healthcare providers understand the regulatory background of disclosure and the interpersonal concerns it raises.

(Call No. Pt Rights 131-014 2012)

Order Now